What is the relationship between binary and machine language

BBC Bitesize - GCSE Computer Science - Introducing binary - Revision 1

what is the relationship between binary and machine language

The only language computer hardware can understand is binary code consisting of 1s and 0s. Learn how compilers and interpreters are used. Machine code and binary are the same - a number system with base 2 - either a 1 or 0. But machine code can also be expressed in hex-format (hexadecimal) - a . Audio, images and characters all look like binary numbers in machine code. These numbers are encoded in different data formats to give them meaning, eg the.

Sure, the "CODE" is a bunch of numbers, but what people are wondering I'm guessing is "what actually is happening physically? Machine code, to the actual circuitry, isn't numbers or values.

Introducing binary

Machine code is a bunch of voltage gates that are either open or closed, and depending on what they're connected to, a certain light will flicker at a certain time etc. I'm guessing that the "machine code" dictates the pathway and timing for specific electrical signals that will travel to reach their overall destination. So for3 voltage gates are closed The 0's3 are open The 1's I know I'm close to the right answer here, but I also know it's much more sophisticated - because I can imagine that which I don't know.

what is the relationship between binary and machine language

So I guess let's break it down? A bit is either 1 or 0, "On" or "Off", "Open" or "Closed" so bit processors process " " - this many bits at once. Some CPUs have it hard-wired into the transistors, others are programmed in microcode. In modern x86 processors instead it's all fake - the x86 opcodes are mostly just a compatibility layer that hides the actual microarchitecture of the processor, which is so allowed to change in each new generation of CPUs.

These processors internally do any kind of tricks - pipelining, instruction reordering, branch prediction, It's also necessary to look at the definition of "shifter operand", which begins on physical page To encode the above ADD, we fill in the fields like this: Now, to make that into a single bit number, we have to expand it out to binary, because many of the fields are not tidy numbers of bits long: We could equally say that it is the decimal number 3,, but that obscures the pattern of fields more than hex does.

  • What is Machine Language?
  • Machine code

Audio, images and characters all look like binary numbers in machine code. These numbers are encoded in different data formats to give them meaning, eg the 8-bit pattern could be the number 65, the character 'A', or a colour in an image.

encoding - Difference between machine language, binary code and a binary file - Stack Overflow

Encoding formats have been standardised to help compatibility across different platforms. This larger number of combinations can be used to represent many more things, eg a greater number of different symbols, or more colours in a picture. In the early days of computing, the only way to enter data into a computer was by flicking switches or by feeding in punched cards or punched paper tape.

what is the relationship between binary and machine language

Since computers work using binary, with data represented as 1s and 0s, both switches and punched holes were easily able to reflect these two states - 'on' to represent 1 and 'off' to represent 0; a hole to represent 1 and no hole to represent 0. Charles Babbage's Analytical Machine in and the Colossus used during the Second World War were operated using punched cards and tapes.

what is the relationship between binary and machine language