Explain the relationship between insulin and glucose graph

How Your Body Uses Glucose and Insulin: American Diabetes Association®

explain the relationship between insulin and glucose graph

In this activity you will examine the relationship between glucose and insulin in the The model equations describe the concentration of glucose and insulin in In figure 2 you see that we have a vector of input values that reads [0 9 10 40 Am J Obstet Gynecol. Dec;(6 Pt 1) Relationships between glucose levels and insulin secretion during a glucose challenge test. Berkus MD( 1). What is the link between diabetes and the pancreas? What are the symptoms of high and low blood sugar levels? Find out in this article.

Skipping meals and poor nutrition can lower blood sugar. By storing glucose, the liver makes sure blood glucose levels stay steady between meals or during sleep. When blood glucose falls, cells in the pancreas secrete glucagon.

Glucagon instructs the liver to convert glycogen to glucose. This makes glucose more available in the bloodstream. From there, insulin attaches to insulin receptors on cells to make sure they can absorb glucose.

Insulin and glucagon work in a cycle. Glucagon interacts with the liver to raise blood sugar, while insulin lowers blood sugar by helping the cells to use glucose. How blood sugar levels affect the body Insulin and glucagon don't work straightaway, particularly if the blood sugar is very high or very low.

explain the relationship between insulin and glucose graph

High blood sugar Symptoms of high blood sugar include: Urinating more often than usual. The kidneys respond to high blood sugar by trying to get rid of excess glucose. Feeling excessively thirsty, especially if also urinating often. As the kidneys try to regulate blood sugar, it can cause dehydration and feelings of intense thirst.

This is not caused by high blood sugar, but by the low insulin effect that often goes with high blood sugar. Excessive hunger and thirst are common symptoms of high blood sugar levels.

People with Type 2 diabetes also known as adult-onset diabetes make their own insulin, but the cells of Type 2 diabetics do not respond to the insulin anymore.

  • How Insulin and Glucagon Work
  • Normal Regulation of Blood Glucose
  • Relationships between glucose levels and insulin secretion during a glucose challenge test.

The body keeps making more and more insulin to make up for the impaired response; eventually, the insulin-making cells lose functionality from being overworked.

As a result, glucose stays in their blood for extended periods of time and fails to move into cells as quickly as it should. As with Type 1 diabetics, this constantly elevated blood sugar can lead to a variety of medical complications within the body, such as heart disease, nerve damage, kidney damage, and more. What is the relationship between glucose and insulin levels in a non-diabetic person?

Elimination Tool As glucose increases, insulin remains constant. B As glucose increases, insulin decreases. C As glucose increases, insulin increases.

D There is no relationship between glucose and insulin. Why does the insulin level decrease? How long after glucose release starts does the blood glucose level return to normal? That is, how long does the glucose spike last?

At what glucose release rate in the model does the body begin passing excess glucose into the urine? You may need to choose a higher glucose release rate to observe the alert. If you eat 3 candy bars at different times in 2 hours, how do you think your blood glucose and insulin levels would respond?

How do you think the model's graphs will look? Use the blank graphs below to sketch your chosen glucose release rate and your predictions of the shape of the blood glucose and insulin curves. Choose three glucose release rates to represent the 3 candy bars Run the simulation. How do the model's graphs compare with your predictions? Eating complex carbohydrates Foods like beans, rice, oats and other cereal grains, fleshy fruit, vegetables, whole-grain bread, and pasta contain combinations of sugars and starches.

Digestion converts these complex carbohydrates into glucose at a much steadier rate than the rapid absorption of simple sugars. You are going to simulate the body's response to eating pasta.

explain the relationship between insulin and glucose graph

Open the glucose release input graph. Use the blank graphs below to record the curves that the model generates. How does this blood glucose graph differ from the same graph generated by eating a candy bar question 5? What might cause the difference? How is the insulin graph different from the same graph generated by eating a candy bar question 5? Why do the blood glucose and insulin graphs have a similar shape in a particular simulation? How do you think the graphs would look if you extended the model run longer than minutes?

Use the blank graphs below to sketch your chosen glucose release rate and your prediction of the shape of the blood glucose and insulin curves. At the lower right corner of each graph, write the number of minutes you would extend the model run. What body responses are you showing in your predictions? Playing the Part of the Pancreas The human pancreas secretes chemicals to break down almost all food molecules, buffers against stomach acid, and hormones including insulin. After you eat, glucose enters your bloodstream faster than your cells can use it.

Your blood glucose level rises, stimulating the beta cells in the pancreas to secrete insulin.

Insulin - Wikipedia

Insulin targets mainly liver, fat and muscle cells to use glucose or store excess as glycogen. In this part of the activity, you will be simulating pancreatic action by controlling the insulin secretion rate for three glucose release scenarios. For each scenario, you will make a hypothesis about how the pancreas should respond to a particular change in glucose release rate.

From your hypothesis, you will try to predict the blood glucose and insulin levels from the insulin secretion rate you have chosen.

How insulin and glucagon work to regulate blood sugar levels

Each prediction has two parts: You will be using a second version of the glucose-insulin prebuilt model shown in figure 3. It is similar to Glucose 1, but has a large constant block for the insulin secretion in the lower left of the model box. This constant lets you change the value of the insulin secretion rate, a value that in Glucose 1 was controlled by the model. In Glucose 2, you will control the insulin secretion rate to keep the blood glucose level within a healthy range.

Simulink model Glucose 2. Green blocks represent scopes that display the calculated quantities as a function of time. Magenta blocks define model parameters that can be changed by the user. Blue blocks implement mathematical functions. The yellow blocks are the integrators. What is a healthy blood glucose range for human adults?